Red wine and chocolate chip cookies

The New Yorker recently published a thorough history of the chocolate chip cookie and according to the author, the American delicacies pair well with milk, coffee and tea, but also red wine and whiskey!

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Thanks Creative Commons. You’re the best!

 

I have had red wine and chocolate chip cookies and can vouch for the tasty partnership. I wouldn’t recommend dipping though. Unlike milk, which tastes even more delicious as the cookie crumbles sink to the bottom of the glass making for a mushy shot at the end, tis not the case with wine. Best stick to taking a bite of one and then a sip of the other.

More about the chocolate chip cookie’s history:

Ruth Wakefield, who ran the popular Toll House restaurant in Whitman, Massachusetts, with her husband, Kenneth, from 1930 to 1967, brought the Toll House Chocolate Crunch Cookie into being in the late nineteen-thirties. The recipe, which has been tweaked over the ensuing decades, made its first appearance in print in the 1938 edition of Wakefield’s “Tried and True” cookbook. Created as an accompaniment to ice cream, the chocolate-chip cookie quickly became so celebrated that Marjorie Husted (a.k.a. Betty Crocker) featured it on her radio program. On March 20, 1939, Wakefield gave Nestlé the right to use her cookie recipe and the Toll House name. In a bargain that rivals Peter Minuit’s purchase of Manhattan, the price was a dollar—a dollar that Wakefield later said she never received (though she was reportedly given free chocolate for life and was also paid by Nestlé for work as a consultant).

To read the article in its entirety, visit newyorker.com.